Tags

,

51ejoflgdl__sl500_aa280_

Superstition

Siouxsie & The Banshees

Universal Music/Polydor 2014

Review by David Bowling

 

Siouxsie & The Banshees last four albums have just been re-issued with bonus tracks. The third release in the series is their 1991’s Superstition.

The early 1990’s marked a period of change for the band as they moved closer to the mainstream. The lead single from the album, “Kiss Them For Me,” symbolizes the change as it features a foundation of dance rhythms with strings added to give it close to a pop sound. The lyrics are a little wicked in places but that did not prevent the song from becoming their only top 40 hit in the United States.

The change in sound may have alienated some of their fans but the album proved to be their most commercially successful in the United States. The lyrics are still some what obscure in places but the music is lighter than in the past and the rough edges are polished and made a lot smoother.

“Shadowtime” is a pure up-tempo pop piece, while “The Ghost In You” is mesmerizing. “Fear (Of The Unknown)” is fit for a 1990’s dance club with its up-tempo beat.

The three bonus tracks are the best of the four releases. While “Kiss Them For Me” is a different mix and inferior to the one that was released on the album, the other two inclusions are good news. “Kiss Them For Me Kathak #1 Mix was previously unreleased and is more of a throwback to their previous sound. “Face To Face,” the single release version, was featured in the film Batman Returns. It has a slow tempo with orchestration. It may not fit into the original album’s music but as a stand-alone piece it has a depth of textures.

Superstition is a different type album for Siouxsie & The Banshees as they leave their alternative rock roots in the past. It is a solid release but does not have the creative energy of their previous albums. How you appreciate this change of direction will determine whether this is an addition to your music collection.

 

Rating: ***

Advertisements